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Thursday, June 24, 2010

REALLY Don't Want Kids? New Permanent Birth Control Adiana Now Offered by Planned Parenthood

Posted by Alison Hallett on Thu, Jun 24, 2010 at 3:02 PM

God, that headline is long. I'm sorry, I tried. Anyway, Planned Parenthood has just announced that they will now be offering Adiana at their Southeast clinic, a permanent, "98.4% effective" form of female contraception. According to the press release, it's a fast, pain-free process (I can find nothing on the internet to disagree with these assertions) in which "tiny, soft inserts (about the size of a grain of rice) are placed inside a woman's fallopian tubes, stimulating the body's own tissue to grown in and around the inserts, permanently blocking the fallopian tubes." (So, very similar to Essure—the one with the coils.) The Oregon Health Plan covers it. Your insurance probably covers it. The full press release is after the jump; meanwhile, here's a not-particularly-enlightening video of an Adiana insertion. (It's... pink?)

News Release from: Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette
PLANNED PARENTHOOD NOW OFFERING ADIANA®: AN IN-OFFICE, PERMANENT BIRTH CONTROL OPTION FOR WOMEN
Posted: June 24th, 2010 12:21 PM

Portland, OR ˆ June 24, 2010 ˆ This June, Planned Parenthood Columbia Willamette (PPCW) began offering Adiana®, an affordable permanent birth control option for women, to patients in Portland. Adiana is a safe, simple, in-office procedure that prevents pregnancy for the rest of a woman's life. It is 98.4% effective in preventing pregnancy, and can be performed during a simple office visit.

Adiana is a minimally-invasive, in-office procedure (no cuts or incisions). Tiny, soft inserts (about the size of a grain of rice) are placed inside a woman's fallopian tubes, stimulating the body's own tissue to grow in and around the inserts, permanently blocking the fallopian tubes. No drugs or hormones are used. The procedure takes less than 15 minutes to perform, and only a local anesthetic is needed. Most women report little or no pain, and return to normal activities within one day.

"For women who no longer want to have children, Adiana is a non-invasive, convenient option for permanent birth control," described Dr. Mark Nichols, PPCW's Medical Director. "The recovery period is extremely fast ˆ most women are able go back to work or normal activities the very next day."

Adiana is a permanent birth control option for women who are finished having children or don't desire to have children in the future. The procedure prevents pregnancy for the rest of a woman's life, so she no longer has to remember to take a birth control pill, schedule appointments for a birth control shot, apply a birth control patch, or remember other types of birth control. The one-time cost of Adiana also eliminates the need to pay monthly or annually for birth control.

"Planned Parenthood is committed to ensuring that all women in Oregon and SW Washington have access to a full range of affordable birth control options ˆ and that includes a convenient permanent birth control option for women," said David Greenberg, PPCW President and CEO. "For many women, options for a permanent birth control method are sometimes limited. Adiana provides women with a permanent birth control option right here in our health centers."

Most major insurance companies provide coverage for Adiana. The Oregon Health Plan (which provides health coverage for more than 380,000 low-income Oregonians) also covers Adiana.

Women interested in Adiana can schedule an information session with staff in Bend, Salem, or Portland to learn more about the procedure. PPCW is currently performing Adiana procedures at its SE Portland health center.

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