This Week in the Mercury

Everything as Fuck
Snow Job

Film

Snow Job

The Untold Story of Gil Scott-Heron



Thursday, June 30, 2011

Tonight: Last Thursday

Posted by Matt Stangel on Thu, Jun 30, 2011 at 4:19 PM

While tonight's Last Thursday art walk should have plenty of street-level hoopla to stumble between, there are a number of new exhibits opening that I wanted to point out: FalseFront is hosting Michael Endo's Pain Scale; Screaming Sky has new work from Guy Burwell; Gloss Gallery brought in Angy Wills' Certain Absolutelessness; Together Gallery's Idea Board 3 features Jay Howell (who designed the characters for Bob's Burgers), Mark Warren Jacques, Timothy Karpinski, and others; and my top pick of the night goes to Appendix Space for Neverland, a collaborative installation by Daniel J. Glendening and Michael Welsh.

Click on past the jump for more info on Neverland.

Daniel J. Glendenings We May See A Great and Unrecognizable Future
  • Daniel J. Glendening
  • Daniel J. Glendening's We May See A Great and Unrecognizable Future

The press release for Neverland describes Daniel J. Glendening and Michael Welsh's collaborative project as "a single dreamlike environment, a survivalist clubhouse seemingly torqued out of time." While I can't claim to know how that will translate into art objects, I recently spent some time with Glendening's thesis project at PNCA's 2011 MFA graduate show (titled We May See A Great and Unrecognizable Future), and I found myself intrigued by the enigmatic systems from which the artist communicates.

Stacks of records were encased in crystal growth, petri dishes held pads of mold, and domestic items like furniture, posters, and books were arranged in such a way that suggested a functional space. Meanwhile, wires ran between rows of murky water bottles and on to plants, paintings, and fluorescent lights. The whole thing felt part dorm room, part meth lab. Conceptually, the included objects centered around 1960s' counterculture, which, according to Glendening's artist statement, represents the "utopian and apocalyptic visions" brought on by "social destabilization."

If Glendening's senior thesis is an indicator, Neverland should be worth the trip.

Appendix Project Space "is located in the south alley between 26th and 27th Avenues off of NE Alberta Street." Neverland opens at 7 pm, and for more info, hop on over to Appendix's website.

Comments

Subscribe to this thread:

Comments are closed.

All contents © Index Newspapers, LLC

115 SW Ash St. Suite 600
Portland, OR 97204

Contact Info | Privacy Policy | Production Guidelines | Terms of Use | Takedown Policy