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Monday, January 13, 2014

Maybe All That NSA Spying Isn't Really Stopping Terrorists

Posted by Paul Constant on Mon, Jan 13, 2014 at 1:29 PM

The government claims that the NSA's bulk collection and analysis of communications metadata is necessary to fight terrorism. The New America Foundation released a report today that calls bullshit on that claim. From their introduction to the report:

An in-depth analysis of 225 individuals recruited by al-Qaeda or a like-minded group or inspired by al-Qaeda’s ideology, and charged in the United States with an act of terrorism since 9/11, demonstrates that traditional investigative methods, such as the use of informants, tips from local communities, and targeted intelligence operations, provided the initial impetus for investigations in the majority of cases, while the contribution of NSA’s bulk surveillance programs to these cases was minimal. Indeed, the controversial bulk collection of American telephone metadata, which includes the telephone numbers that originate and receive calls, as well as the time and date of those calls but not their content, under Section 215 of the USA PATRIOT Act, appears to have played an identifiable role in initiating, at most, 1.8 percent of these cases. NSA programs involving the surveillance of non-U.S. persons outside of the United States under Section 702 of the FISA Amendments Act played a role in 4.4 percent of the terrorism cases we examined, and NSA surveillance under an unidentified authority played a role in 1.3 percent of the cases we examined.

Follow the link to read the full report in PDF.

(Via Swampland.)

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